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MYRTE a terrestrial example of our vessel’s energy system

Island territories are the best energy-autonomy laboratories. Cut off from the continental grid, and often only having access to reduced infrastructures, they have to handle the variations in electrical production and demand and adapt to the intermittent availability of renewable energies.
Energy Observer's crew meet the Myrte Project in Corsica

In Corsica, solar and wind power is limited to 30% in order to mitigate an eventual electrical shortage. To optimize these energies and respond to the ever-increasing demand for energy, the University of Corsica, in conjunction with the Commission for Atomic and Alternative Energies (CEA) and HELION, has developed MYRTE, a solution which utilizes hydrogen to revalue the surplus of renewable energy during peak production, in order to restore it to the network during spikes in demand.

  • A member of the Myrte project

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    Energy Observer's crew meet the Myrte Project in Corsica

  • Myrte's solar panels

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    L'équipe d'Energy Observer rencontre le projet Myrte en Corse

  • Myrte Energy Storage platform

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    L'équipe d'Energy Observer rencontre le projet Myrte en Corse

  • Myrte Energy Storage platform

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    L'équipe d'Energy Observer rencontre le projet Myrte en Corse

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The Mission for Renewable Hydrogen for Integration in the Electrical Network (MYRTE) is simply a terrestrial application of Energy Observer’s power system: the platform is composed of an electrolyzer that produces hydrogen and oxygen from water molecules during hours of low consumption. A fuel cell is then used to convert the hydrogen into electricity to power the network during times of high demand, like in the evening when the solar panels are inactive.